Through hypnosis, your brain will be stimulated in new ways, such that you will experience a sudden breakthrough that will create an opening for new perspectives, and a new approach to life.

There is a difference between the experiences we have and live and the way our brain stores those experiences. In other words, there is a representation of those experiences in our brain that will shape the way we remember those experiences and how we will operate in our lives after those experiences happened. The brain organizes our experiences in certain ways and we tend to live at the effect of those experiences, no matter whether they are positive or negative.

Science has proven, that the brain has a natural tendency to focus on the negative experiences. It does that out of survival, as an automatic self-protection mechanism. The scientific term used in neuro-science is negativity bias. This information is a relief because now we know that focusing on the negative is not a personal flaw. The brain is bias toward negative activity.

While working together, we will focus on shifting perspectives inside your mind. We will address the “thinking errors” that dominate your life and stop you from doing what you want.

Have you experienced trauma? 

When trauma has happened, your system uses more resources than it can refuel. You tend to operate from fixing what’s wrong with you or what’s not working, while your system is, in fact, shut down. You are operating from a survival mode. This is not your fault; it’s biology. However, you cannot get out of this default mode without external support. Compassionate communication, feeling cared for, and feeling loved are the universal medicine and deeply rewarding.

Profound positive changes can happen through hypnosis when you open yourself up to healing.

Have you ever asked yourself these three questions:

What do I want to experience?

In what ways do I want to grow?

How do I want to contribute to the world?


“The development of particular neurological connections or skills does not occur gradually over time, “ says Akira Yoshii, a brain researcher at MIT. “Instead such changes tend to occur suddenly, appearing in short intervals after robust stimulation.”